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MERIT BADGES
 Text
Graphic
Note:
Eagle Required
         are in Italics

"A"
American Business
American Culture
American Heritage
American Labor
Animal Science
Archaeology
Archery
Architecture
Art
Astronomy
Athletics
Atomic Energy
Auto Mechanics
Aviation

"B"
Backpacking
Basketry
Bird Study
Bugling

"C"
Camping
Canoeing
Chemistry
Cinematography
Citizenship Community*
Citizenship Nation*
Citizenship World*
Climbing
Coin Collecting
Collections
Communications*
Computers
Cooking
Crime Prevention
Cycling*

"D"
Dentistry
Disability Awareness
Dog Care
Drafting

"E"
Electricity
Electronics
Emergency Preparedness**
Energy
Engineering
Entrepreneurship
Environmental Science*

"F"
Family Life*
Farm Mechanics
Fingerprinting
Fire Safety
First Aid*
Fish & Wildlife Mgmt.
Fishing
Fly Fishing
Forestry

"G"
Gardening
Genealogy
Geology
Golf
Graphic Arts

"H"
Hiking
Home Repairs
Horsemanship

"I"
Indian Lore
Insect Studies

"J"
Journalism

"K"

"L"
Landscape Architecture
Law
Leatherwork
Lifesaving**

"M"
Mammal Study
Medicine
Metalwork
Model Design & Building
Motorboating
Music

"N"
Nature

"O"
Oceanography
Orienteering

"P"
Painting
Personal Fitness**
Personal Management*
Pets
Photography
Pioneering
Plant Science
Plumbing
Pottery
Public Health
Public Speaking
Pulp and Paper

"Q"

"R"
Radio
Railroading
Reading
Reptile & Amphibian Study
Rifle Shooting
Rowing

"S"
Safety
Salesmanship
Scholarship
Sculpture
Shotgun Shooting
Skating
Skiing
Small Boat Sailing
Soil & Water Conservation
Space Exploration
Sports**
Stamp Collecting
Surveying
Swimming**

"T"
Textile
Theatre
Traffic Safety
Truck Transportation

"U"

"V"
Veterinary Medicine

"W"
Water Skiing
Weather
Whitewater
Wilderness Survival
Wood Carving
Woodwork

"X"
"Y"
"Z"

 

lifesaving.gif (7425 bytes)  Lifesaving*
Requirements
2002
  1. Before doing requirements 2 through 15
    1. Complete Second Class requirements 7a through 7c and First Class requirements 9a through 9d.
      • Second Class requirements 7a through 7c
        1. Tell what precautions must be taken for a safe swim.
        2. Demonstrate your ability to jump feet-first into water over your head in depth, level off and swim 25 feet on the surface, stop, turn sharply, resume swimming, then return to your starting place.
        3. Demonstrate water rescue methods by reaching with your arm or leg, reaching with a suitable object, and by throwing lines and objects. Explain why swimming rescues should not be attempted when a reaching or throwing rescue is possible, and explain why and how a rescue swimmer should avoid contact with the victim.
      • First Class requirements 9a through 9c:
        1. Tell what precautions should be taken for a safe trip afloat.
        2. Successfully complete the BSA swimmer test.
        3. With a helper and a practice victim, show a line rescue both as tender and as rescuer. (The practice victim should be approximately 30 feet from shore in deep water).
    2. Swim continuously for 400 yards using each of the following strokes in a strong manner for at least 50 continuous yards: front crawl, sidestroke, breaststroke, and elementary backstroke.
  2. Explain the following:
    1. Common drowning situations and how to prevent them.
    2. How to identify persons in the water who need assistance.
    3. The order of methods in water rescue.
    4. How rescue techniques vary depending on the setting and the condition of the person needing assistance.
    5. Situations for which in-water rescues should not be undertaken.
  3. Demonstrate "reaching" rescues using various items such as arms, legs, towels, shirts, paddles, and poles.
  4. Demonstrate "throwing" rescues using various items such as lines, ring buoys, rescue bags, and free-floating supports. Successfully place at least one such aid within reach of a practice victim 25 feet from shore.
  5. Show or explain the use of rowboats, canoes, and other small craft in performing rescues.
  6. List various items that can be used as rescue aids in a non-contact swimming rescue. Explain why buoyant aids are preferred.
  7. Perform the following equipment-based rescues for a conscious practice subject 30 feet from shore. Use a proper entry and a strong approach stroke. Speak to the subject to determine his condition and to provide instructions and encouragement.
    1. Present a rescue tube to the subject, release it, and escort the victim to safety.
    2. Present a rescue tube to the subject and use it to tow the victim to safety.
    3. Present a buoyant aid other than a rescue tube to the subject, release it, and escort the victim to safety.
    4. Present a buoyant aid other than a rescue tube to the subject and use it to tow the victim to safety.
    5. Remove street clothes in 20 seconds or less and use a non-buoyant aid, such as a shirt or towel, to tow the subject to safety. Explain when it is appropriate to remove heavy clothing before attempting a swimming rescue.
  8. Explain the importance of avoiding contact with an active victim and describe lead-and-wait tactics.
  9. Perform the following non-equipment rescues for a conscious practice subject 30 feet from shore. Begin in the water from a position near the subject. Speak to the subject to determine his condition and to provide instructions and encouragement.
    1. Provide a swim-along assist for a calm, responsive, tired swimmer moving with a weak forward stroke.
    2. Perform an armpit tow for a calm responsive, tired swimmer resting with a back float.
    3. Perform a cross-chest carry for an exhausted, passive victim who does not respond to instructions to aid himself.
  10. In deep water, show how to escape from a victimís grasp on your wrist. Repeat for front and rear holds about the head and shoulders.
  11. Perform the following rescues for an unconscious practice subject at or near the surface 30 feet from shore. Use a proper entry and strong approach stroke. Speak to the subject and splash water on him to determine his condition before making contact. Remove the victim from the water, with assistance if needed, and position for CPR.
    1. Perform an equipment assist using a buoyant aid.
    2. Perform a front approach and wrist tow.
    3. Perform a rear approach and armpit tow.
  12. Describe how to respond if a victim submerges before being reached by a rescuer, and do the following:
    1. Recover a 10-pound weight in 8 to 10 feet of water using a feet-first surface dive.
    2. Repeat using a headfirst surface dive.
  13. Demonstrate knowledge of resuscitation procedures:
    1. Describe how to recognize the need for rescue breathing and CPR.
    2. Demonstrate proper CPR technique for at least 3 minutes using a mannequin designed to simulate ventilations and compressions.
  14. Demonstrate management of a spinal injury:
    1. Explain the signs and symptoms of a spinal injury
    2. Support a face up victim in calm, shallow water.
    3. Turn a subject from a facedown to a face-up position while maintaining support.
  15. Show that you know first aid for other injuries or illnesses that could occur while swimming or boating, including hypothermia, heat reactions, muscle cramps, sunburn, stings, and hyperventilation.
 

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Last Update March 28, 2004