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VENTURING

 
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AWARDS
 
Bronze
Gold
Silver
Ranger

 

 

Elective Requirements

Backpacking

Mountaineering
Cave Exploring Outdoor Living History
Cycling/Mountain Biking Physical Fitness
Ecology Plants and Wildlife
Equestrian Project COPE
First Aid Scuba
Fishing Shooting Sports
Hunting Watercraft
Lifesaver Winter Sports
 

Backpacking

  1. Develop a personal exercise plan and follow it for at least three months, exercising at least three times a week. Set your goals with backpacking in mind and write them down. Keep a daily diary.
  2.  
    1. Try on three types of backpacks. Learn how to choose the proper size frame for your body size. Learn and then be able to explain to others the difference between a soft pack, an internal frame pack, and an external frame. Tell the pros and cons of each type and what kind of trek you would take with each pack.
    2. Explain the different parts of a backpack and their use.
    3. Learn the proper way to lift and wear your backpack.
    4. Describe at least four ways to limit weight and bulk in your backpack without jeopardizing your health and safety.
    5. Learn how you would load an internal frame pack versus one with an external frame.
  3.  
    1. Pack your backpack with your personal gear, including outdoor essentials, additional gear, and personal extras. Pack as though You were sharing equipment with one other person for a three-day, two-night backpacking trip.
    2. List at least 10 items essential for an overnight backpacking trek and explain why each item is necessary.
    3. Present yourself to an experienced backpacker, unload your pack, have him or her critique your packing, then repack your pack. Have him or her critique your efforts.
  4.  
    1. List at least 20 items of group backpacking gear. Include a group cleanup kit.
    2. Learn how and then demonstrate how to cook a meal using a backpacking stove.
    3. Demonstrate proper sanitation of backpacking cook gear,.
    4. Learn how to properly pack and carry a backpacking stove and fuel.
  5.  
    1. List at least 10 environmental considerations that are important for backpacking and describe ways to lessen their impact on the environment.
    2. Considering Leave No Trace principles, tell how to dispose of the human waste, liquid waste, and garbage you generate on a backpacking trip.
  6.  
    1. Participate in three different treks of at least three days and two nights each, covering at least 15 miles in distance each.
    2. Plan and lead a backpacking trek (can be one of the treks in (a) above) with at least five people for at least two days. This group can be your crew, another crew, a Boy Scout group, or another youth group.
    3. Plan the menu for this trek using commercially prepared backpacking foods for at least one meal.
    4. Check for any permits needed and prepare a trip plan to be left with your family. Have an emergency contact number.
    5. Using the map you used to chart your course, brief the crew you are leading on your trip plan.
    6. Lead a shakedown for those you are leading.
  7.  
    1. Learn about proper backpacking clothing for backpacking in all four seasons.
    2. Learn about proper footwear, socks, and foot care.
    3. Learn and then demonstrate at least three uses for a poncho in backpacking.
  8.  
    1. Learn about trail health considerations and typical backpacking injuries such as hypothermia, frostbite, heat exhaustion, heat stroke, altitude sickness, dehydration, blisters, stings and bites, and sprains and how to avoid and treat these injuries and illnesses.
    2. Because fluid intake is so important to a backpacker, tell how to take care of your water supply on a backpacking trip. include ways of purifying water and why that is important.
    3. Prepare a first aid kit and survival kit for your backpack.
  9. Using all the knowledge you have acquired about backpacking, make a display or presentation for your crew, another crew, a Boy Scout group, or another youth group. Include equipment and clothing selection and use, trip planning, environmental considerations, trail health and safety considerations, food selection and preparation, and backpacking physical preparation.
Cave Exploring
  1.  
    1. Write the National Speleological Society (NSS) to request information about caving and information about caves and cavers near you.
    2. Learn about the different tv es of caves.
    3. Learn about caving courtesy, caving dos and don'ts, and what the BSA policy is on cave exploring.
    4. Read at least one book about caving.
  2.  
    1. Learn the following knots used in caving:
      • Endline knots: bowline figure six, figure eight on a bight
      • Midline knots: bowline on a bight and butterfly
      • Joiner knots: water knot, fisherman, figure eight on bend
      • Prusik knot
    2. Teach these knots to your crew, another crew, a Cub Scout or Boy Scout group, or another group.
  3.  
    1. Learn about the different types of ropes available for climbing and caving and explain the uses of each and the characteristics of each.
    2. Learn proper climbing rope care. Know and practice proper coding and storage.
    3. Know how to keep proper records on climbing rope and how to inspect it for wear and damage. Know when to retire a rope.
    4. Using the knowledge acquired above, make a tabletop display or a presentation for your crew, another crew, a Cub Scout or Boy Scout group, or another group.
  4.  
    1. Demonstrate that you know how to properly and safely rappel a distance of at least 30 feet.
    2. Demonstrate that you know how to ascend a rope using mechanical ascenders or Prusik or other ascending knots. Ascend at least 30 feet.
    3. Know and explain the differences, advantages, and disadvantages of single rope (SRT) and double rope (DRT) for rappelling and belaying.
  5.  
    1. Visit a sporting goods store or NSS-affiliated organization or have them make a presentation to your crew so you can learn about personal caving gear, including helmets, light sources, backup lighting sources, clothing, boots, cave packs, etc.
    2. Find out what the American National Standards Institute requirements are for helmets.
  6.  
    1. Make a list of what you need in your personal cave pack. Include your personal first aid kit and cave survival gear.
    2. Learn what crew equipment is, including a first aid kit, caving ropes, and ascending equipment.
    3. Help make a first aid kit for your crew or group and demonstrate that you can keep it up.
    4. Demonstrate to your crew, another crew, a Cub Scout or Boy Scout group, or another group how to construct both a personal and crew first aid kit.
  7.  
    1. Learn about the many types of cave formations.
    2. Make a tabletop display or presentation on cave formations and caving conservation for your crew, another crew, a Cub Scout or Boy Scout group, or another group. Include practices such as proper carbide removal; care of walls, ceiling, and formations; and principles of Leave No Trace.
  8. Find a cave you would like to visit; get permission to enter it; make a trip plan including cave location, a list of participants, expected time in the cave, expected date and time of return, and an emergency contact; and then go in the cave, led by a qualified caver.
  9. From a cave expert, learn about natural and fabricated hazards such as mudslides, loose rocks, pits, deep water, critters, complex routes, wooden ladders, and flooding.
  10.  
    1. Using a three-dimensional cave map, learn what the standard map symbols represent.
    2. Using the knowledge above, make a tabletop display or presentation for your crew, another crew, a Cub Scout or Boy Scout group, or another group.

Cave Safety

Caves can be dangerous if you are not properly trained or equipped. Here are some cave safety tips:

  1. Join an experienced group for proper training and safe caving.
  2. Never go caving alone. At least four cavers are a minimum.
  3. Always carry three sources of light.
  4. Don't attempt caves beyond your ability.
  5. Use proper gear, including a properly fitted helmet and suitable clothes.
  6. Leave word with family or friends about your trip plan, including cave location and expected return time.
  7. Always use the safer alternative when you have an option.

 

Cycling/MountainBiking
  1. Describe the difference between cycling (touring) and mountain biking.  
  2.  
    1. Know the laws governing biking in your state.
    2. Learn and know bicycle safety rules and gear for your preferred type of biking.
    3. Give a presentation and safe biking session to your crew, another crew, a Cub Scout or Boy Scout group, or another group using the knowledge you have gained.
    4. Demonstrate proper first aid for head injuries.

    (If you choose mountain biking as your discipline, do 3(a) and (b).)

  3.  
    1. Learn the mountain biking rules for the trail as stated by the IMBA (International Mountain Biking Association) and explain what is meant by soft cycling.
    2. Describe environmental considerations that are important for mountain biking and describe ways to lessen their impact on the environment.
  4.  
    1. Establish a maintenance checklist that needs to be reviewed before each tour or trip.
    2. Make and keep a personal biking journal and record information on at least three tours or trips.
  5.  
    1. Buy or build a bike tool and repair kit.
    2. Show you know how to use each tool in the kit.
    3. Repair a flat tire, adjust your brakes, properly adjust your seat and handlebars, repair a broken chain, and show you know how to temporarily repair a buckled wheel.
  6.  
    1. With the approval of the property owner or land manager, plan and lead a one-day bike trail or road maintenance project.
    2. Write an article about your project for your school or community newspaper.
  7.  
    1. Take at least eight separate cycling tours 20 miles in length or eight separate mountain biking treks 10 miles in length.
    2. Keep a personal journal of your eight trips, noting routes covered, weather conditions, sketches, maps, and sights seen. Also note significant things along the trails such as trail markers, downhills, climbs, rocks, drops, log hops, and portages.
  8. In addition to the tours and treks in 7, plan and do a two-day cycling tour 50 miles in length or mountain bike trek 40 miles in length. Your trip plan should include routes, food, proper clothing, and safety considerations. Record in your journal.
  9. Do (a) or (b):
    1. Make a tabletop display or presentation on cycling or mountain biking for your crew, another crew, a Cub or Scout group, or another group.
    2. Make a where-to-go biking guide for your area which has at least 10 trips or places to bike. Invite your crew, other crews, Cub and Scout groups, and other groups to use this guide.
Ecology
  1. Explain the basic natural systems, cycles, and changes over time and how they are evidenced in a watershed near where you live. Include the four basic elements, land use patterns, and at least six different species in your analysis and how they have changed over time. Discuss both biological and physical components.
  2. Describe at least four environmental study areas near where you live. Include the reasons for selecting these areas, their boundaries, user groups, past inventories, any outside forces that interact with them, and a list of what things could be studied at each of them.
  3. Plan a field trip to each of the above areas, including detailed plans for conducting various investigations. Follow all of the requirements such as trip permits, safety plans, transportation plans, equipment needs, etc.
  4.  
    1. Under the guidance of a natural resources professional, carry out an investigation of an ecological subject approved by your Advisor. Inventory and map the area. Conduct a detailed investigation providing specific data for a specific topic.
    2. Document and present your findings to your crew, another crew, a Cub or Boy Scout group, or another group.
  5. Teach others in your crew, another crew, a Cub or Boy Scout group, or another group how to carry out an ecological investigation. Use steps 3 and 4 above with the group so that they may also learn by doing.


Equestrian

  1. Explain the characteristics of each of the three distinct American riding styles.
  2. For your preferred style (one of three styles in 1), explain the equipment you would use, including parts of the saddle and bridle.
  3. Explain the difference in natural versus artificial aids used in communicating with your horse, such as use of hands, legs, weight, voice, whips, crops, martingales, bits, and auxiliary reins.
  4.  
    1. Present yourself properly attired for the riding style you prefer.
    2. Explain the clothing and safety equipment a rider must have for your preferred style of riding.
  5.  
    1. Demonstrate how to properly catch, bridle, and saddle a horse.
    2. Demonstrate and explain at least three steps in proper mounting and two ways of dismounting.
  6.  
    1. Show how to test your correct stirrup length while you are dismounted and when you are mounted.
    2. Explain short stirrup length, medium stirrup length, long stirrup length, and why stirrup length is important.
  7.  
    1. Explain and demonstrate the correct position of your body, feet, hands, arms, and legs while mounted.
    2. Demonstrate how all parts of your body should be positioned on your horse during a trot, a canter, and a gallop and explain why this is important.
  8. Demonstrate by using a pattern that you have control of your horse. On command, be able to slow down, speed up, stop, back up and be able to move your horse through its gaits.
  9.  
    1. Properly remove tack from your horse and store it.
    2. Demonstrate proper care of your tack after riding.
    3. Demonstrate proper care for your horse after a ride, including cool down, brushing, and watering and feeding, and explain why each of these steps is important.
  10. Make a tabletop display or presentation on what you have learned about horsemanship for your crew, another crew, a Cub Scout or Boy Scout group, or another group.
First Aid
  1.  
    1. Build a personal first aid kit or help build a group first aid kit.
    2. Know how to use everything in the kit.
    3. Teach another person in your crew, another crew, a Cub or Boy Scout group, or other how to make and use a personal or group first aid kit.

Do B, C, or D.

  1. Complete a 25 hour emergency first aid course plus the American Red Cross's When Help Is Delayed module or equivalent course.
  2. Complete a 45-hour emergency response course plus the American Red Cross's When Help Is Delayed module or equivalent course.
  3. Complete an EMT Basic course offered through a local hospital, college, or first aid crew.
Fishing
  1.  
    1. Become familiar with the freshwater fishing laws, regulations, and license requirements for your state.
    2. If you live in a coastal state, become familiar with the saltwater fishing laws, regulations, and license requirements for your state. If you live in an inland state, become familiar with the saltwater fishing laws, regulations, and license requirements for a coastal state of your choice.
  2.  
    1. Using a map of your state, designate where the different varieties of water are located, such as warm fresh water, cold fresh water (include tail waters), brackish water, and salt water.
    2. On the map, note the most popular game fish found in each spot you marked.
    3. On the map, note any protected fish species found in your state.
  3. Learn and then teach the following to someone else:
    • The four main types of fishing equipment: spincast, spinning, baitcast, and fly. Explain how they differ and the benefits of each type, describing how one might be better for certain fishing situations.
    • Three different fishing knots.
    • How to correctly spool line on a reel of the four types of fishing equipment.
    • How to execute three different types of cast with two of the four types of fishing equipment. Use targets. Know safety measures needed while casting.
  4. Develop a personal ethical code for fishing. List a variety of potential ethical situations where choices may have to be made and describe how you plan to make decisions for those situations.
  5. List at least 10 potential safety situations that you could encounter wh@e fishing in your area and what precautions you should take to protect yourself and your fishing partners.
  6.  
    1. For two different species of game fish found in your state, learn where they are in the food chain, the types of waters they can be found in, and the type of underwater structure and temperature they might be most likely to be found in during the fall, winter, spring, and summer.
    2. Catch at least one fish of each of the above two species.
  7. Do one of the following:
    • Build a fishing rod-the type of your choice.
    • Tie six freshwater or saltwater flies common to your area.
    • Design and make your own fishing lure (not a fly) and explain the fish-attracting principle of the lure.
  8. Do one of the following:
    • Plan or assist with a National Fishing Week or National Hunting and Fishing Day event.
    • Assist with a Hooked On Fishing, Not On Drugs program.
    • Organize and lead a fishing trip or event to introduce other youth to fishing.
  9. Make a tabletop display or presentation for your crew, another crew, a Cub or Boy Scout group, or another youth group on what you have learned about fishing.
Hunting
  1.  
    1. Successfully complete a hunter education course offered by your state wildlife/conservation agency.
    2. Learn and explain the requirements to become a volunteer hunter education instructor in your state.
    3. Explain how to report a wildlife-related violation to the appropriate law enforcement agency.
  2. Do (a), (b), or (c).
    1. Successfully complete a bowhunter education course offered by your state or the National Bowhunter Education Foundation.
    2. Successfully complete a National Muzzle Loading Rifle Association Rifle Basic course.
    3. Participate in a National Rifle Association-International Hunter Education Association Youth Hunter Education Challenge event sponsored by your state.
  3. Do (a), (b), or (c).
    1. Assist a certified hunter education instructor with a hunter education course.
    2. Either plan or assist in putting on a National Hunting and Fishing Day program.
    3. Talk with a game warden/ conservation officer about his/her job. If possible, observe/assist at a game check station in your state.
  4. Plan and carry out a hunting trip approved by an Advisor.
  5. Make a tabletop display or presentation on what you have learned for your crew, another crew, a Cub or Boy Scout group, or another youth group.

Lifesaver

  1. Do (a), (b), or (c)
    1. Complete the Boy Scout or Venturing Lifeguard requirements and hold a current certification. (Note: BSA Lifeguard certification lasts for three years from the time of certification.)
    2. Complete a 45-plus-hour emergency response course or an EMT Basic course.
    3. Earn the American Red Cross Lifeguard Training certificate.
  2.  
    1. Help build a crew or family first aid kit.
    2. Know how to use everything in the kit.
    3. Teach another person or group how to make and use a first aid kit.

Mountaineering

You must complete the first aid core requirement before you begin this elective.

  1.  
    1. Explain the difference between bouldering and technical climbing.
    2. Tell how bouldering can help your crew get ready for more advanced climbing.
    3. Demonstrate bouldering using the three-point stance and proper clothing.
  2.  
    1. Explain the classification and grades of climbing difficulty in technical rock climbing.
    2. Tell how weather can change the difficulty of any ascent.
  3. Learn and then teach the following climbing knots to your crew, another crew, a Scout group, or another group:
    • Figure eight on a bight
    • Water knot
    • Bowline on a coil
    • Figure eight follow-through
    • Grapevine knot
  4.  
    1. Learn about the different types of ropes available for climbing and explain the uses of each and the characteristics of each.
    2. Learn proper climbing rope care. Know and practice proper coiling and storage.
    3. Know how to keep proper records on climbing rope and how to inspect it for wear and damage. Know when to retire a rope.
    4. Using the knowledge acquired above, make a tabletop display or a presentation for your crew, another crew, a Cub Scout or Boy Scout group, or another group.
  5.  
    1. Demonstrate the difference between natural and artificial anchors.
    2. Be able to identify and describe the use of at least three different types of hardware and setups.
    3. Tell about proper climbing safety both before and during a climb.
    4. Learn about rescue equipment and techniques.
    5. Learn about appropriate clothing, footwear, gloves, helmets, and other climbing gear.
  6. Be able to correctly put on and then be able to teach others how to put on at least two of the following:
    • *Commercially made climbing harness
    • Diaper sling
    • Knotted leg-loop seat
    • Swiss seat sling
  7.  
    1. Demonstrate three types of belays.
    2. Learn and then demonstrate that you know proper verbal climbing and belaying signals used between climber and belayer.
  8. Do (a) and (b), or do (c).
    1. Under the supervision of a qualified rappelling or climbing instructor, rapper at least 30 feet down a natural or artificial obstacle.
    2. Under the supervision of a qualified climbing instructor, climb at least 30 feet up a natural or artificial obstacle.
    3. Attend a two-day rock climbing clinic/course led by a qualified climbing instructor. This course should include some instruction on technical rock climbing.
  9. Lead your crew, another crew, an older Boy Scout group, or another teenage group on a climbing and/or rappelling activity. Recruit adequate, qualified adult instructors and assist in instruction.

Outdoor Living History

  1. Research a historical culture and time period of interest to you, such as Native American, mountain man, pioneer, or Revolutionary/Civil War.
  2. Write a 2,000-word essay or make an outline describing the culture's dress, food, housing, customs, etc.
  3. Using your research, make an outfit that represents a person or type of person (soldier, farmer, trader, hunter, chief, etc.) from your chosen culture.
  4. Using your research, construct a working tool or weapon out of authentic materials that would have been used by the person you have chosen to represent in 3 above.
  5. Once your clothing and accoutrements are complete, attend and participate in a pow wow, rendezvous, reenactment, historical trek, or other event that includes your chosen culture.
  6. Make a presentation of your chosen culture to your crew, another crew, a Cub or Scout group, or another group.
  7.  
    1. Organize a group tour to a museum, archaeological dig, or other site of significance to your chosen culture.
    2. After the tour, lead your group in a discussion about what they learned.

Physical Fitness

  1. Make an appointment with your doctor 'N/for a complete physical. Explain to your doctor you are preparing to undertake an eight-week physical fitness improvement program.
  2. Explain at least six principles that guide you in developing a physical fitness program.
  3. Four components of physical fitness are endurance, strength, flexibility, and body composition.
    1. Explain why these components arc important to your physical fitness.
    2. Find a physical fitness professional to administer a fitness test based on these four components. Set physical fitness goals with the help of this professional that can be accomplished in eight weeks. The physical education teachers at school should be able to do this test.
  4. Develop an eight-week program to accomplish your goals. Use the principles of warm-up, cross-training, cool-down, and regularity.
  5. Explain the six elements of a good diet.
  6. Using the USDA Food Guide Pyramid, list six foods from each group.
  7. Learn to calculate the number of calories you need if you are sedentary, moderately active, or active.
  8. Explain the common eating disorders anorexia and bulimia and why they are harmful to athletes.
  9. Explain the hazards of performance-enhancing drugs, including the dangers of using each of the following groups of drugs: stimulants, painkillers, anabolic steroids, beta blockers, diuretics, alcohol, marijuana, and cocaine.
  10. Prevention of injury is important to achieving peak physical performance. Pain is not a normal part of physical development. Soreness and discomfort may be expected, but not pain. Explain how to prevent injury in your fitness program.
  11. Using what you have learned about physical fitness, teach your crew, a Cub or Boy Scout group, or another group about setting up a physical fitness program.

Plants and Wildlife

  1. Write a paper or make a presentation on a plant or wildlife species. Include its value as seen from various perspectives, some of the problems various species face, and how we might be able to help.
  2.  
    1. Select an area approved by your Advisor that contains several species of wildlife or plants. Observe this area thoroughly in various conditions and seasons of the year. Study the history of this area, paying particular attention to how it has changed over time, ownership, land use patterns, and landform and climatic changes.
    2. Make a presentation on interaction between species; the reaction of various species to changes in conditions or outside influences; the degree to which this area provided food, shelter, materials, and protection for each species; population trends; your predictions on the future of these species; suggested actions to protect or enhance the population; and the investigation methods you used.
  3.  
    1. Study a specific plant or wildlife species approved by your Advisor that can be found in several different areas. Observe this species thoroughly in various areas and seasons of the year. Study the history of this species, paying particular attention to how it has adapted over time.
    2. Male a presentation on this species; any reactions to changes in conditions or outside influences; this species' needs for food, soil, shelter, materials, protection, assistance with propagation, etc.; population trends; your prediction for the future of this species; suggested actions to protect or enhance the population; and the investigation methods you used.
  4. Under the guidance of a resource professional, plan, lead, and carry out a project approved by your Advisor designed to benefit plants or wildlife. Involve others so that you can increase their awareness of the condition of plants and wildlife in your area.
  5. Do (a) or (b).
    1. Make a tabletop display or presentation on your project for your crew, another crew, a Cub or Boy Scout group, or another group.
    2. Submit an article about your project to a local newspaper, radio station, your school newspaper, or TV station.

Project COPE

Do 1, 2, or 3.

  1.  
    1. Complete a BSA Project COPE course including both low and high initiatives. (Project COPE stands for Challenging Outdoor Personal Experience and is an outdoor course available through most Boy Scout councils. It usually involves a weekend of team building using group initiative games and low and high ropes course obstacles. This is an excel lent crew activity.)
    2. After you have personally been through a COPE course, help run at least two other COPE courses.
  2. Attend BSA camp school and successfully complete the COPE director's course.
  3. Complete a hands-on outdoor education course through a college or university of at least 80 hours.

SCUBA

  1. Become certified as an Open Water Diver by the Professional Association of Diving Instructors (PADI) or the National Association of Underwater Instructors (NAUI). If PADI or NAUI instruction and certification are not available, certification may be accepted from other agencies that comply with the Recreational Scuba Training Council (RSTC) guidelines, provided that such acceptance has been expressly approved by your local BSA council in consultation with the BSA national Health and Safety Service.
  2. Make a presentation to your crew, another crew, or a Cub or Boy Scout group on what it takes to become certified and some other subject related to scuba diving.
  3. Assist with a Discover Scuba program. (Note: An Open Water Diver may assist with logistics under the guidance of the instructor conducting the program, but is not qualified to and is not expected to perform as a professional-level assistant such as a divemaster or assistant instructor.)

Overview of an Open Water Diver Course

(The following information is provided by PADI)

To get started, contact a local dive center, resort, or diving instructor. The course normally meets five or six times. Depending upon the time available and your schedule, you may complete the program as quickly as over a couple of weekends, or as long as several weeks. There are three basic parts to the course.

Basic knowledge development.
By reading and watching a video, or using a CD-ROM, you learn the basic rules and principles required for diving. You will complete a brief knowledge review to discuss with your instructor prior to each pool diving session, followed by a short quiz. This process is typically divided into five sessions, with a longer, more comprehensive quiz following the fifth one.

Pool diving.
You'll dive in a pool to practice scuba diving skills such as swimming while breathing under water, clearing water from a flooded mask, and sharing air with another diver. There are five pool diving sessions, each of which typically immediately follows a knowledge development review. In some areas, pool diving may be in shallow lake or ocean water with conditions comparable to a pool.

Open water diving.
After you complete the knowledge development and pool diving sessions, you'll make four or more dives in open water with your instructor. During these dives, you will practice the skills you learned while pool diving, and you'll learn to interact with the local diving environment.

Scuba Price Ranges
Scuba certification courses range from $150 to $300 depending on location and access to pool and open-water dive sites. Scuba equipment basics of mask, fins, and snorkel range from $100 to $300. Most training facilities provide scuba rental equipment for training at reasonable prices.

Scholarships
PADI offers a multilevel scholarship program to introduce Venturers to the underwater frontier. Scuba diving is an exciting avocation or vocation that can be enjoyed in just about every part of the country. For scholarship details, contact the Venturing Division, S210, P.O. Box 152079, Irving TX 75015-2079.


Shooting Sports

  1.  
    1. Recite, explain, and demonstrate the three primary shooting safety rules.
    2. Recite and explain the range commands.
    3. Identify the parts of a pistol, rifle, or bow (whichever one you select) and explain the function of those parts.
    4. If you chose air pistol, air rifle, muzzle-loading rifle, pistol, or small-bore rifle for your shooting discipline, explain how "minute of angle" is used to "zero" the airgun or firearm.
    5. If you chose muzzle-loading rifle as your shooting discipline, recite the proper steps for loading a muzzle-loading rifle and the proper sequence of firing the shot. Explain each step.
    6. If you chose archery as your shooting discipline, recite and explain the nine steps to the 10 ring.
    7. If you chose shotgun as your shooting discipline, explain how you sight a shotgun differently than you would a rifle.
  2. Complete a basic training course and the course of fire for one of the following shooting disciplines: (a), (b), (c), (d), (e), (f), or (g).
    (Restrictions: Telescopic sights, electronic sights, and laser sights are prohibited in all disciplines except archery.)
    Shooting must be under the
    supervision of a certified instructor and with equipment approved by that instructor.
    1. Air Pistol (Sporter Course):
      Shoot five shots each at eight TQ7 targets at a distance of 25 feet for a total of 40 shots. You must score 240 out of a possible 400. (You may use any .177 air pistol with a maximum retail value of $75 and may use a onehand grip, two-hand grip, or a combination of both.)
      OR
      Air Pistol (International Course):
      Shoot five shots each at eight bull's-eye B-40 targets at a distance of 33 feet for a total of 40 shots. You must score 220 points of a possible 400. You may use any .177 air pistol. All targets must be fired in the standing position only using only one hand to support the pistol.
    2. Air Rifle (Sporter Course):
      Shoot two shots at each bull (10 shots per target) from a distance of 33 feet using six AR5/5 targets. Of the 60 shots total, shoot 20 shots in each position-prone, standing (off-hand), and kneeling. You must score 225 of a possible 600. (You may use any .177 air rifle with a maximum retail value of $130.)
      OR
      Air Rifle (Precision Course):
      Shoot two shots at each bull (10 shots per target) from a distance of 33 feet. Of the 60 shots total, shoot 20 shots in each position - prone, standing (off-hand), and kneeling. You must score 420 of a possible 600. (You may use any .177 air rifle.)
    3. Archery (Magnifying sites are OK to use in this discipline.)
      Recurve Bow
      Indoor: Shoot 30 arrows at 18 meters on a 60-centimeter five color target. You must score 150 of a possible 300.
      Outdoor: Shoot 30 arrows at 40 meters on a 122-centimeter five color target. You must score 200 of a possible 300.
      OR
      Compound Bow
      Indoor: Shoot 30 arrows at 18 meters on a 40-centimeter five color target. You must score 150 of a possible 300.
      Outdoor: Shoot 30 arrows at 40 meters on a 122-centimeter five color target. You must score 210 of a possible 300.
    4. Muzzle-Loading Rifle:
      (NMLRA = National Muzzle Loading Rifle Association)
      Shoot one shot at each bull's-eye on 10 targets (M02400-NMLRA) for a total of 50 shots from the standing (off-hand) position at a distance of 25 yards. You must score 250 of a possible 500.
      Then, shoot five shots at one target (M02406-NMLRA) from the standing (off-hand) position at a distance of 50 yards. You must score 25 of a possible 50.
      Then, shoot five shots at one target (M02406-NMLRA) from the sitting position, resting the rifle on "crossed sticks" at a distance of 50 yards. You must score 25 of a possible 50.
      (Total shots for muzzle loading is 60 shots.)
    5. Pistol: Shoot:
      10 shots at each of six targets (B-2) from the standing (off-hand) position in a maximum time of 10 minutes per target from a distance of 50 feet. You must score 360 of a possible 600. (You may use any.22-caliber pistol or revolver and can use either the one- or two-hand grip or both.)
      (Total shots for pistol is 60 shots.)
    6. Shotgun:
      Break 25 clay birds of a possible 50 on a skeet course and 25 clay birds of a possible 50 on a trap course.
      OR
      Break 50 clay birds of a possible 100 on a skeet course.
      OR
      Break 50 clay birds of a possible 100 on a trap course.
    7. Small Bore Rifle
      Sporter Course: Using six A17 targets, shoot one shot at each record bull from a distance of 50 feet for a total of 60 shots. Of the 60 shots, you must shoot 20 shots in each position-prone, standing (off-hand), and kneeling. You "lust score 225 of a possible 600. (you may use any .22 rifle with a maximum retail value of $235.)
      OR
      Precision Course: Using six A17 targets, shoot one shot at each record bull from a distance of 50 feet for a total of 60 shots. Of the 60 shots, shoot 20 shots in each position-prone, standing (offhand), and kneeling. You must score 420 of a possible 600. (You may use any.22 rifle.)
  3. Make a tabletop display or presentation for your crew, another crew, a Cub or Boy Scout group, or another youth group about what you have learned about shooting sports. Include information about shooting sports in the summer and winter Olympics.

Watercraft

  1.  
    1. Explain the BSA Safety Afloat plan.
    2. Demonstrate during a watercraft activity that you know the BSA Safety Afloat plan.
  2. Complete a basic boating safety course provided by the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary, U.S. Power Squadrons, US Sailing, American Red Cross, or your state's boating law administrator.
  3.  
    1. Learn and demonstrate water rescue techniques, including self rescue, group rescue, boat assisted rescue, short-line rescue, boat-over-boat rescue, and rescuing a pinned craft.
    2. Learn and demonstrate that you know the rules for avoiding water-caused hypothermia and what to do in case of hypothermia.
  4. Make a presentation to your crew, another crew, a Cub or Boy Scout group, or another youth group on boating safety.

Do 5, 6, or 7.

  1.  
    1. Learn the American Whitewater Affiliation Safety Code.
    2. Demonstrate during a watercraft activity that you know the American Whitewater Affiliation Safety Code.
    3. Learn about the International Scale of River Difficulty.
    4. Learn and be able to describe the six classifications of rivers.
    5. On a whitewater river map of your choice, be able to show why different sections are classified the way they are.
    6. Learn and explain the differences in recreational canoes, touring canoes, downriver canoes, whitewater playboat canoes, decked canoes, recreational kayaks, touring kayaks, and whitewater playboat kayaks.
    7. Learn and use paddling techniques and maneuvers for:
      • Canoe, both single and double passenger
      • Kayak, single or double passenger
    8. Paddle a slow river a distance of at least eight miles or run a whitewater river a distance of six miles with at least one class III rapid.
  2.  
    1. Learn and demonstrate the BSA rules for boardsailing.
    2. Learn how to boardsail.
  3. Become certified as a US Sailing Small Boat Sailor or US Sailing Instructor.

Winter Sports

  1. Be familiar with cold weather-related injuries and how to avoid and treat them.
  2. Know and explain the safety codes for your chosen winter sport (alpine skiing, Nordic skiing, snowboarding, snowmobiling, or ice skating). Example: Skier's Responsibility Code found in the National Ski Areas Association Classroom Guide for skier education, published by the National Ski Patrol.
  3. Design a 30-day physical fitness and stretching program that will prepare you for your chosen winter sport, including exercising and stretching for at least 30 minutes three times a week for 30 days.
  4. Choose one of the following winter sports and complete the requirements for that sport.


Alpine Skiing

  1. During a winter season, participate in at least six recreational ski sessions totaling 40 hours.
  2. On one of your ski trips, demonstrate to the adult ski counselor approved by your Advisor that you are proficient in this sport, skiing various types of ski terrain, including moguls.
  3. Give instruction and assistance to a group of beginner skiers. Teach them basic turns and stops.
  4. Make a tabletop display or presentation for your crew, another crew, a Cub or Boy Scout group, or another youth group on alpine skiing.

Nordic Skiing

  1. During a winter season, participate in at least six recreational ski sessions totaling 40 hours.
  2. On one of your ski trips, demonstrate to the adult ski counselor approved by your Advisor that you are proficient in this sport, skiing all types of ski terrain, and that you can use a map and compass while skiing.
  3. Give instruction and assistance to a group of beginner Nordic skiers.
  4. Make a tabletop display or presentation for your crew, another crew, a Cub or Boy Scout group, or another youth group on Nordic skiing.

Snowboarding

  1. During a winter season, participate in at least six recreational snowboarding sessions totaling 40 hours.
  2. On one of your ski trips, demonstrate to the adult snowboarding counselor approved by your Advisor that you are proficient in this sport, snowboarding all types of ski terrain, including jumps and other boarding maneuvers.
  3. Give instruction and assistance to a group of beginner snowboarders.
  4. Make a tabletop display or presentation for your crew, another crew, a Cub or Boy Scout group, or another youth group on snowboarding.

Snowmobiling

  1. During a winter season, participate in at least six recreational snowmobiling sessions totaling 40 hours.
  2. On one of your ski trips, demonstrate to the adult snowmobiling counselor approved by your Advisor that you are proficient in this sport, snowmobiling all types of terrain, and that you can navigate using maps and compass to plan and carry out a trip.
  3. Give instruction and assistance to a group of beginner snowmobilers.
  4. Make a tabletop display or presentation for your crew, another crew, a Cub or Boy Scout group, or another youth group on snowmobiling.

Ice Skating

  1. Participate in at least 10 recreational skating sessions totaling 40 hours.
  2. On one of your skating trips, demonstrate to the adult skating counselor approved by your Advisor that you are proficient in this sport.
  3. Give instruction and assistance to a group of beginner skaters.
  4. Make a tabletop display or presentation for your crew, another crew, a Cub or Boy Scout group, or another youth group on ice skating.

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Last Update March 26, 2003